Woke

From Wiki 4 Men
Revision as of 11:54, 9 February 2024 by Robert Brockway (talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Woke is a widely-used adjective. Woke is generally understood to involve supporting or believing in various notions that are widely accepted among social justice warriors. People who consider themselves woke generally:

The woke are typically intolerant but use the language of tolerance. They are typically exclusionary while using the language of inclusion. They typically claim to be kind but are often unkind.

Dictionary Definitions

Oxford English Dictionary

woke, adjective: Originally: well-informed, up-to-date. Now chiefly: alert to racial or social discrimination and injustice; frequently in stay woke[1]

Werriam-Webster

aware of and actively attentive to important societal facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice)[2]

Other Definitions

Crikey, an Australian web site supportive of woke, offers definitions used by those that support and those that oppose woke:

Support

"[T]o be informed, educated on and aware of social injustices". [3][4]

Oppose

"[T]o be overly politically correct and to police other’s words". [5][6]

History

The term is derived from African-American Vernacular English (AAVE) meaning alert to racial prejudice and discrimination. Beginning in the 2010s, it began to take on a wider meaning covering all areas in which social justice warriors are involved.

The phrase stay woke had emerged in AAVE by the 1930s, in some contexts referring to an awareness of the social and political issues affecting African Americans. The phrase was uttered in a recording by Lead Belly and later by Erykah Badu. Following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014, the phrase was popularised by Black Lives Matter (BLM) activists seeking to raise awareness about police shootings of African Americans. After seeing use on Black Twitter, the term woke became an Internet meme and was increasingly used by white people, often to signal their support for BLM, which some commentators have criticised as cultural appropriation. Mainly associated with the millennial generation, the term spread internationally and was added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2017.

By 2020 the self-identified woke had recognised a backlash and were concerned.[7][8]

This article contains information imported from the English Wikipedia. In most cases the page history will have details. If you need information on the importation and have difficulty obtaining it please contact the site administrators. Wikipedia shows a strong woke bias. Text copied over from Wikipedia can be corrected and improved.

References