Difference between revisions of "The Red Pill"

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The Red Pill is a documentary on the [[men's rights movement]] made by [[Cassie Jaye]]. Though it was originally planned to denounce the movement's alleged misogyny, upon learning that the movement was generally focused in equality, Jaye shifted the focus of the film to be more sympathetic. It includes interviews with prominent men's rights activists such as [[Paul Elam]], [[Warren Farrell]], and the [[Honey badgers]], as well as with notable feminists.
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The Red Pill is a documentary on the [[men's rights movement]] in the United States made by [[Cassie Jaye]]. Though it was originally planned to denounce the movement's alleged misogyny, upon learning that the movement was generally focused on equality, Jaye shifted the focus of the film to be more even-handed. It includes interviews with prominent men's rights activists such as [[Paul Elam]], [[Warren Farrell]], and the [[Honey badgers]], as well as with notable feminists.
  
Jaye found it difficult to receive funding for a film that was sympathetic towards the men's rights movement. As such, she set up a Kickstarter campaign in order to fund it independently. A common misconception is that the movie was primarily funded by men's rights activists, but in actuality the majority of funders were merely free speech advocates who lacked strong opinions on the gender debate.<ref>http://www.dailydot.com/irl/red-pill-mens-rights-documentary/</ref>
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Jaye found it difficult to receive funding for a film that did not denounce the men's rights movement. As such, she set up a Kickstarter campaign in order to fund it independently. A common misconception is that the movie was primarily funded by men's rights activists, but in actuality, the majority of funders were merely free speech advocates who lacked strong opinions on the gender debate.<ref>http://www.dailydot.com/irl/red-pill-mens-rights-documentary/</ref>
  
The film was met with great controversy by feminists. In particular, a petition arose in Australia to prevent its showing,<ref>http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/news-and-views/news-features/melbournes-palace-cinemas-cancel-screenings-of-mra-documentary-the-red-pill-after-petition-20161025-gsa79y.html</ref> and the University of Calgary cancelled a screening of the film.<ref>http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/wildrose-on-campus-fire-comms-director-1.4012824</ref> However, it was well received with men's rights activists due to its sympathetic and honest examination of the movement.
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The film was met with great controversy by feminists. In particular, a petition arose in Australia to prevent its showing,<ref>http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/news-and-views/news-features/melbournes-palace-cinemas-cancel-screenings-of-mra-documentary-the-red-pill-after-petition-20161025-gsa79y.html</ref> and the University of Calgary cancelled a screening of the film.<ref>http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/wildrose-on-campus-fire-comms-director-1.4012824</ref> However, it was well received with men's rights activists due to its honest examination of the movement.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
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[[Category:Featured Articles]]
 
[[Category:Featured Articles]]
 
[[Category:Men's Rights]]
 
[[Category:Men's Rights]]
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[[Category:United States]]

Latest revision as of 08:39, 19 May 2020

The Red Pill is a documentary on the men's rights movement in the United States made by Cassie Jaye. Though it was originally planned to denounce the movement's alleged misogyny, upon learning that the movement was generally focused on equality, Jaye shifted the focus of the film to be more even-handed. It includes interviews with prominent men's rights activists such as Paul Elam, Warren Farrell, and the Honey badgers, as well as with notable feminists.

Jaye found it difficult to receive funding for a film that did not denounce the men's rights movement. As such, she set up a Kickstarter campaign in order to fund it independently. A common misconception is that the movie was primarily funded by men's rights activists, but in actuality, the majority of funders were merely free speech advocates who lacked strong opinions on the gender debate.[1]

The film was met with great controversy by feminists. In particular, a petition arose in Australia to prevent its showing,[2] and the University of Calgary cancelled a screening of the film.[3] However, it was well received with men's rights activists due to its honest examination of the movement.

References