Difference between revisions of "Warren Farrell"

From Wiki 4 Men
Jump to: navigation, search
 
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 2: Line 2:
  
 
Arguably a turning point in Farrell's role in the men's rights movement came in 1993, when he published ''[[The Myth of Male Power]]''. The book, still seen as a mainstay in men's rights communities, examines the blind spots of [[feminism]] and [[patriarchy]] theory and points at the various sacrifices men are expected to make by traditional gender roles. He discusses concepts such as [[male disposability]], self-sacrifice, and the idea that men are expected to be "success objects" that give status and money to their significant others.
 
Arguably a turning point in Farrell's role in the men's rights movement came in 1993, when he published ''[[The Myth of Male Power]]''. The book, still seen as a mainstay in men's rights communities, examines the blind spots of [[feminism]] and [[patriarchy]] theory and points at the various sacrifices men are expected to make by traditional gender roles. He discusses concepts such as [[male disposability]], self-sacrifice, and the idea that men are expected to be "success objects" that give status and money to their significant others.
 +
 +
== See Also ==
 +
 +
*[[Success object]]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
[[category:Biographies]]
+
 
 +
[[Category:Biographies]]
 +
[[Category:Featured Articles]]

Latest revision as of 01:43, 18 May 2020

Warren Farrell is a leading voice in the men's rights movement. He began as a feminist during the movement's second wave due to his belief in equality. However, he was denounced by feminists due to his support of father's rights and other men's issues.[1] As such, he became disillusioned with the feminist movement despite still caring about women's rights. He began shifting his focus towards men's issues.

Arguably a turning point in Farrell's role in the men's rights movement came in 1993, when he published The Myth of Male Power. The book, still seen as a mainstay in men's rights communities, examines the blind spots of feminism and patriarchy theory and points at the various sacrifices men are expected to make by traditional gender roles. He discusses concepts such as male disposability, self-sacrifice, and the idea that men are expected to be "success objects" that give status and money to their significant others.

See Also

References